Don’t have time to do it right, but have time to do it twice?

Why don’t we have time to do it right, but somehow we do have time to do it twice?

My paraphrase of a quote by John Wooden (quote number 5)

How come we often think it is better to rush into something we don’t understand and hack at it than to take the time to understand what it is we are really trying to achieve and then think about how we will achieve that before we start coding?

Do we not learn from our mistakes?

Do we not see, measure or understand the cost of halting a developer, who is by now working on another story, to get them to switch context and think back to the rushed coding they did on the previous story. To get them to diagnose the root cause of the bug we just discovered? Or see, measure or understand the time it takes to diagnose, resolve then rebuild and re-test this change through the entire pipeline? With a very real risk that when handed back to the tester that she will find another issue as the fix was rushed and we did not have enough coverage in our pipeline of automated checks to discover the regression that was introduced.

I have seen this pattern throughout my life and have been guilty of it myself. So what do I do about it?

Well I try to discipline myself, but what I do for my teams is to use BDD to ensure we have shared and common understanding of what story we are about to do, changes we are about to make, additions we are introducing. To ensure we all understand who needs these changes and why they are important to them. (Who the customer is and why they care). Then we, (the three amigos – slide 9), will be able to agree some high level examples of what ‘done’ looks like for this piece of work. These examples will be in the the form of tests that will adequately specify and thus prove we have delivered what was required. We call these the acceptance tests. They are defined before any coding is started. Hence the ‘driven development’ part of BDD. Where possible these tests are automated and are required to be passed, (via automation or manual checking), before the story is pulled by QA, (we use Kanban), to do a final exploratory test.

We are not perfect at this, but it really does mean that we can get a story accepted more often than not on its first pass through the pipeline. If it doesn’t we all understand the work well enough to learn from the mistake(s) and improve.