Testing vs Checking

There has been a lot of discussion over the last couple of years about test automation and in particular the varying definitions of testing vs checking and how that applies to test automation.

I broadly agree there is a difference, here is my paraphrased understanding of each definition;

Testing – the art and science of conducting experiments and carefully observing the results, all the while making multiple evaluations against explicit and implicit expectations. A fundamentally human, (or manual if you prefer), exercise.

Checking – the deterministic evaluation of the outcome of an action or step such that a pass or fail is recorded.

But there seems to be an underlying theme to most of these discussions, almost a fear. It is as if someone has threatened the existence of manual or human testing.

I do agree that there has been a general drive towards more automation of ‘tests’, and that this has been largely associated with the adoption of agile practices. I myself have encouraged, and in some cases demanded, more investment in, and thus more, automation of tests in companies I have worked for. However, I have also encouraged and hired for manual testing, and have coached and mentored folks to be better exploratory testers (what I call brain engaged testing).
So I don’t subscribe to the fear that manual testing is a thing of the past or an unnecessary overhead. Perhaps this is why I don’t share in the what seems to be an attempt at a sharp delineation between automation and testing?

Like Michael Bolton, I do see automation as a tool and as something that supports testing.
I often use the phrase automation assisted testing, to refer to exploratory or other manual testing where the test setup or initial test data has been achieved using automated tools or scripts.

My preference is to develop automation code in a re-usable fashion, producing a library of re-usable code that is easy to ‘glue’ together in different ways such that different automated tests (or checks if you will) are achievable quickly and efficiently. But this approach also lends itself well to re-using these library ‘functions’ to assist with manual testing. If developed well then anyone with fairly basic coding skills should be able to combine some of these together in order to ‘drive’ a system under test to the point where you want to start your exploration or manual testing. Or as mentioned before, to prime the system under test with the exact data you want or need, in order to conduct the exploratory or manual testing you wish to execute next.

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